Nurse Practitioner Programs in Texas

In Texas, there are 17,810 Nurse Practitioners presently employed, and the future looks promising. With a projected need for 24,600 new NPs by 2030, there is substantial growth expected in the field. However, the state’s Restricted Practice model and limited prescriptive authority necessitate a health team environment for effective healthcare delivery.

  1. Educational Requirements: To become a Nurse Practitioner in Texas, individuals must first obtain an RN license, followed by a Master’s or Doctoral degree from an accredited nursing program. This advanced education equips them to handle more complex aspects of patient healthcare.
  2. Licensure and Certification: Prospective NPs in Texas must secure state licensure from the Texas Board of Nursing and a national certification in their chosen specialty. These credentials validate their competence and readiness to provide quality healthcare services.
  3. Scope of Practice: Texas operates under a Restricted Practice model. This requires Nurse Practitioners to have a collaborative agreement with a physician to deliver patient care services, thereby enabling a team approach to healthcare.
  4. Prescriptive Authority: In Texas, Nurse Practitioners have limited prescriptive authority. They can prescribe medications, including controlled substances, under a delegated medical act, allowing comprehensive patient care while maintaining physician oversight.
  5. Employment and Salary Statistics: Texas employs 8% of all U.S. Nurse Practitioners, who earn an average annual salary of $117,890 or $56.68 per hour. These figures highlight the state’s recognition of these professionals’ crucial contributions to healthcare.
  6. Job Outlook: With a forecasted need for an additional 2,010 NPs annually until 2030, Texas promises a healthy job landscape. This growing demand underlines the state’s commitment to quality healthcare.
  7. Regulatory Body: The Texas Board of Nursing serves as the primary regulatory body, ensuring high standards of practice, granting licensure, and maintaining professional integrity.

Texas’ projected demand for Nurse Practitioners, combined with its collaborative practice model and fair salaries, paints a promising scenario for these healthcare professionals. For those yearning to make a significant impact in healthcare, Texas offers a framework that encourages teamwork and makes an environment conducive for growth.

What are the 10 Best Nurse Practitioner Programs in Texas for 2023?

#1 in Texas

The University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing

School of Nursing

  • Pin1
    301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX - 77555-0129
  • Tel1
    (409) 772-1011
  • Programs: Adult Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, CNL, Family Nurse Practitioner, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Educator, Registered Nursing
  • Award Levels: Bachelor, BSN to PhD, Doctor of Nursing, MSN, MSN to DNP
Person
Nurse Admin: Deborah Jones, PhD, RN, NEA-BC
Title: Dean

University Information

  • Faculty Total Faculty: 723
  • Tuition In-State Undergraduate Tuition: N/A
  • Book Book and Supplies: N/A
  • Receiving Aid Percent Received Aid: N/A
  • Scholarship Average Grant or Scholarship: $1,638,948
  • Admitted Percent Admitted: N/A
  • Enrolled Percent Admitted who Enrolled: N/A
  • Graduation Rate Graduation Rate: N/A

At the University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing, aspiring nurses will embark on an MSN program designed to equip them for specialized, advanced roles in healthcare. With seven unique tracks available, students can align their studies to best meet their career goals and the evolving needs of the healthcare system. By the end of the program, graduates will be ready to influence healthcare practice, lead nursing teams, and provide expert care across different patient populations.

Nurse Practitioner (NP) Programs

The MSN program at UTMB School of Nursing is comprehensive, offering seven distinct tracks that cater to a wide range of specialties within nursing. From Family Nurse Practitioners to Neonatal Nurse Practitioners, students have the opportunity to specialize in areas that align with their career goals and interests.

The Adult-Gerontology tracks, both Acute Care and Primary Care, equip students to work with varying age groups, from young adults to geriatrics, focusing on acute care settings or primary care. The Neonatal Nurse Practitioner track prepares students for advanced nursing care for critically ill neonates, while other tracks offer focuses on leadership, education, and more.

Graduates from these programs are well-prepared to seek national certification and engage in advanced nursing practices. They are educated to synthesize evidence, research, and theory; develop collaborative relationships; provide leadership; and adhere to legal and ethical standards. The UTMB School of Nursing emphasizes not only specialized knowledge but also the human values of cultural sensitivity, compassion, integrity, and respect.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Diverse Specializations: The MSN program at UTMB offers seven different tracks, allowing students to specialize in areas ranging from acute care to neonatal care and leadership roles, thereby catering to various interests and career paths within nursing.
  2. Holistic Education: Beyond technical skills, the program emphasizes human values such as compassion, cultural sensitivity, and integrity. Graduates are trained to view healthcare not just as a service but as a compassionate practice that requires interpersonal understanding.
  3. Preparation for Certification and Advanced Roles: Graduates are not only prepared for national certification through reputable organizations but are also trained to assume advanced nursing roles, where they can actively participate in political, economic, and organizational changes to promote health within the global environment.

#2 in Texas

The University of Texas at El Paso

School of Nursing

  • Pin1
    500 W. University Ave, El Paso, TX - 79968-0691
  • Tel1
    (915) 747-5000
  • Programs: Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Family Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Registered Nursing
  • Award Levels: Accelerated BSN, Bachelor, MSN, MSN to DNP, Post Master's NP Certificate, RN to BSN, RN to MSN
Person
Nurse Admin: Leslie K. Robbins, PhD, APRN, PMHNP/CNS-BC, FAANP, ANEF
Title: Dean

University Information

  • Faculty Total Faculty: 818
  • Tuition In-State Undergraduate Tuition: $9,744
  • Book Book and Supplies: $1,632
  • Receiving Aid Percent Received Aid: 88%
  • Scholarship Average Grant or Scholarship: $7,362
  • Admitted Percent Admitted: 100%
  • Enrolled Percent Admitted who Enrolled: 25%
  • Graduation Rate Graduation Rate: 44%

The UTEP College of Nursing Graduate Program offers a versatile Nurse Practitioner Degree (NP) with a selection of six concentration areas that cater to specific populations and advanced practice roles. The concentrations determine the focus of care, whether primary or secondary, and encompass areas like adult gerontology, family care, neonatal care, and pediatric care.

Nurse Practitioner (NP) Programs

  1. Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (AGACNP): This concentration prepares graduates to care for adults with acute and chronic health issues, allowing them to sit for national certification through ANCC or AACN.

  2. Family Nurse Practitioner with Primary Care Focus (FNP): The FNP concentration equips students to assume care for individuals and families across the lifespan, with an emphasis on primary care, wellness promotion, and diagnosis and management of acute and chronic illness.

  3. Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (NNP): This specialized track readies nurses to deliver high-quality care in acute care neonatal settings, focusing on preterm and term neonates and infants up to 2 years of age.

  4. Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (PNP-AC): This concentration allows students to focus on the care of young patients with complex acute, chronic, and critical health conditions, in settings like hospitals and emergency departments.

  5. Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (PNP-PC): This track prepares nurses to be primary care providers for children and adolescents, encompassing health promotion, development assessment, and the management of well and ill children in various settings.

  6. Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (Across the Lifespan): The Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) concentration at UTEP focuses on a holistic approach to mental health, encompassing the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of psychiatric conditions across all age groups. This includes children, adolescents, and adults. Graduates are prepared to prescribe medications and provide therapeutic interventions such as psychotherapy. The track is conducted as a hybrid program, with courses delivered both through traditional face-to-face classrooms and online formats. The in-person classroom sessions are scheduled on alternating weekends beginning in the second year of the program. Graduates are eligible to take the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner examination for national certification.

All concentrations lead to eligibility for specific national certification exams, providing graduates with the opportunity to seek advanced practice status in their respective areas of specialty.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Specialized Concentrations: UTEP's NP degree offers six distinct concentrations, allowing students to specialize in areas such as adult-gerontology, family care, neonatal care, or pediatric care, reflecting the diverse roles and responsibilities within the nursing profession.
  2. Preparation for Certification: Each concentration is structured to prepare graduates for specific national certification exams through reputable organizations, facilitating their transition into advanced practice roles.
  3. Holistic Focus: The program is not limited to clinical skills but also includes a comprehensive approach to promoting, maintaining, and restoring health across various age groups and health conditions, reflecting the multifaceted nature of modern healthcare.

#3 in Texas

The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

School of Nursing

  • Pin1
    7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio, TX - 78229-3900
  • Tel1
    (210) 567-2620
  • Programs: Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, CNL, Family Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Registered Nursing
  • Award Levels: Accelerated BSN, Bachelor, BSN to PhD, Doctor of Nursing, MSN, MSN to DNP, Post Master's NP Certificate
Person
Nurse Admin: Eileen T. Breslin, PhD, RN, FAAN
Title: Dean And Professor

University Information

  • Faculty Total Faculty: 1339
  • Tuition In-State Undergraduate Tuition: N/A
  • Book Book and Supplies: N/A
  • Receiving Aid Percent Received Aid: N/A
  • Scholarship Average Grant or Scholarship: $2,759,791
  • Admitted Percent Admitted: N/A
  • Enrolled Percent Admitted who Enrolled: N/A
  • Graduation Rate Graduation Rate: N/A

The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio offers a comprehensive Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program, allowing students to earn the highest professional degree in nursing practice. This program offers two paths to earning the DNP:

  1. BSN to DNP Track: Designed for nurses who hold a bachelor's degree in nursing, this track enables students to earn a DNP in three years. Specialties include Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Family Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Primary Care, and Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner. With over 400 clinical affiliates, the university guarantees clinical placement and arranges clinical rotations. The program is delivered in a hybrid format, with on-campus attendance required one to three days per week.

  2. MSN to DNP Track: Aimed at individuals with a master's degree in nursing, this track prepares students to become systems-level thinkers. They can choose from leadership tracks in Advanced Practice Leadership and Executive Administrative Management, with both part-time and full-time study options available. The program requires 480 clinical/practicum hours, and additional hours may be needed to fulfill the total 1,000-hour requirement based on the review of hours completed at the master's level.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Two Pathways to DNP: The university offers two tracks for earning a DNP, catering to both BSN and MSN graduates, emphasizing leadership, evidence-based practice, population health, and specialty clinical practice.
  2. Flexible Course Delivery: The BSN to DNP track is delivered in a hybrid format, allowing a blend of online and on-campus learning, while offering full-time and part-time options to cater to various student needs.
  3. Broad Range of Specialties: With a selection of specialties, from acute care to psychiatric mental health, the program caters to various career interests and prepares graduates for advanced roles in healthcare.

#4 in Texas

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Cizik School of Nursing

  • Pin1
    7000 Fannin, Houston, TX - 77030
  • Tel1
    (713) 500-4472
  • Programs: Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Family Nurse Practitioner, Registered Nursing
  • Award Levels: Accelerated BSN, APRN Certificate, Bachelor, Doctor of Nursing, MSN, MSN to DNP, Post Master's NP Certificate, RN to BSN
Person
Nurse Admin: Diane Santa Maria, DrPH, MSN, RN, PHNA-BC
Title: Dean

University Information

  • Faculty Total Faculty: 1816
  • Tuition In-State Undergraduate Tuition: N/A
  • Book Book and Supplies: N/A
  • Receiving Aid Percent Received Aid: N/A
  • Scholarship Average Grant or Scholarship: $2,392,148
  • Admitted Percent Admitted: N/A
  • Enrolled Percent Admitted who Enrolled: N/A
  • Graduation Rate Graduation Rate: N/A

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston offers a wide array of nursing programs to cater to various levels and specializations within the nursing field. These programs include:

  1. Family Nurse Practitioner MSN Track:

    • Overview: Focused on health promotion, risk reduction, disease prevention, and illness management.
    • Structure: Mostly online coursework with some in-person lab and simulation requirements.
    • Completion: 5-7 semesters; 41 credit hours; 660 clinical hours.
    • Certification: Graduates can apply for national certification exams; first-time pass rate for FNP board certification is 94-100%.
    • Tuition: Among the lowest in the state.
  2. BSN-DNP FNP Track:

    • Overview: Ideal for those seeking to become a Family Nurse Practitioner, this track includes on-site clinical training and high-tech simulations.
    • Completion: 10 semesters; 79 credit hours; 1,140 clinical hours.
    • Educational Mode: Mix of online and on-campus courses.
  3. Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Track:

    • Overview: Prepares nurses for inpatient care for patients across the lifespan, with online courses and on-campus clinical requirements.
    • Certification: National certification exams offered by ANCC or AANPCB.
  4. Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Track:

    • Overview: Flexible, hybrid track designed for working nurses, focusing on mental health care.
    • Certification: Eligibility to take the PMHNP certification examination offered by the American Nurse Credentialing Center.
  5. Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree:

    • Options: Among the top-ranked programs in the nation, with choices for BSN to DNP options.
  6. Affordability and Flexibility:

    • Overview: Cizik School of Nursing provides one of the most affordable BSN to DNP options in Texas, along with scholarships.
    • Flexible DNP Degree Program: Designed for working nurses, with online coursework and in-person experiences.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Broad Opportunities: The university offers a variety of tracks to suit different career goals and levels of education in nursing.
  2. Practical Learning: The integration of high-tech simulations and on-site clinical training allows for real-world application of knowledge.
  3. Flexibility: The various programs are crafted to cater to working professionals, providing a blend of online and on-campus experiences.
  4. Reputation: The university's first-time pass rates and national ranking showcase its commitment to quality education in the field of nursing.
  5. Affordability: Competitive tuition rates and scholarship opportunities make these programs accessible for aspiring nurses in Texas.

#5 in Texas

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

School of Nursing

  • Pin1
    3601 4th Street, Lubbock, TX - 79430
  • Tel1
    (806) 743-1000
  • Programs: Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Family Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Midwife, Nursing Informatics, Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Registered Nursing
  • Award Levels: Accelerated BSN, APRN Certificate, Bachelor, BSN to DNP, MSN, MSN to DNP, Post Master's NP Certificate, RN to BSN, RN to MSN
Person
Nurse Admin: Michael L. Evans, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, FACHE
Title: Dean And Professor

University Information

  • Faculty Total Faculty: 758
  • Tuition In-State Undergraduate Tuition: N/A
  • Book Book and Supplies: N/A
  • Receiving Aid Percent Received Aid: N/A
  • Scholarship Average Grant or Scholarship: $4,324,321
  • Admitted Percent Admitted: N/A
  • Enrolled Percent Admitted who Enrolled: N/A
  • Graduation Rate Graduation Rate: N/A

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing is focusing on the preparation of knowledgeable, compassionate nurses, addressing the critical nursing shortage both in West Texas and nationwide.

Starting with its first class in 1981, the school has expanded to offer not only traditional programs but also master's and post-master's programs in various areas of nursing specialization and the Doctor of Nursing Practice. More than 1,500 students are enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program across campuses located in Lubbock, Amarillo, Odessa, and Abilene

In an effort to create new and innovative paths to education, the school has developed accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing tracks, enabling students to apply existing knowledge to complete their BSN in less time. The program options include R.N. to BSN, Second-Degree BSN, and the Veteran to BSN Program, which gives veterans credit for military service.

Master of Science in Nursing offerings are comprehensive, with options in MSN Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner TrackMSN Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, MSN Family Nurse PractitionerMSN Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, and MSN Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner. Additionally, Post-Graduate certificates are available in many of the same areas.

The DNP program prepares nurses for leadership roles in various domains including nursing practice, business, administration, clinical research, and academia. Specific tracks in BSN to DNP Family Nurse Practitioner and BSN to DNP Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner reduce the time required for students to become doctoral-prepared professionals.

Complementing the academic programs, the School of Nursing also offers training in global health and clinical experience through nurse-managed clinics, like the Larry Combest Community Health and Wellness Center in Lubbock and the Abilene Community Health Clinic. These experiences provide students with hands-on knowledge assisting vulnerable populations.

#6 in Texas

The University of Texas at Austin

School of Nursing

  • Pin1
    110 Inner Campus Drive, Austin, TX - 78705
  • Tel1
    (512) 471-3434
  • Programs: Family Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Registered Nursing
  • Award Levels: Accelerated MSN, Bachelor, BSN to PhD, Doctor of Nursing, MSN, MSN to DNP, Post Master's NP Certificate
Person
Nurse Admin: Alexa K. Stuifbergen, PhD, RN, FAAN
Title: Dean

University Information

  • Faculty Total Faculty: 2801
  • Tuition In-State Undergraduate Tuition: $11,752
  • Book Book and Supplies: $724
  • Receiving Aid Percent Received Aid: 66%
  • Scholarship Average Grant or Scholarship: $10,643
  • Admitted Percent Admitted: 32%
  • Enrolled Percent Admitted who Enrolled: 46%
  • Graduation Rate Graduation Rate: 88%

The Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program offers advanced study in nursing science, professional foundations and related fields. Students must hold a Registered Nurse license and either a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree or equivalent qualifications.

Concentration areas include:

1) Adult - Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist (AG CNS): Focuses on health restoration and promotion, with skills development in case management and emphasis on physiological and psychosocial theories. Graduates can take the national certification examination for recognition as a Clinical Nurse Specialist.

2) Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP): A 48-credit hour program combining primary care skills with community health nursing. It emphasizes health promotion, disease prevention, and management of common illnesses. Graduates are eligible for certification exams from the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and American Academy for Nurse Practitioner (AANP).

3) Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PCPNP): Concentrates on primary care for children from newborns to 21, with training in child development, parenting, health promotion, disease prevention, and management of common illnesses. The program is the first to offer Touchpoints training, and graduates can take certification exams for Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioners.

4) Psych/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program (PMHNP): A 49-credit hour program preparing graduates to provide psychiatric-mental health care at an advanced level to individuals of all ages. Graduates are eligible for the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) certification examinations for family psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners.

Key Student Takeaways:

1) Alternate Entry Option: For individuals not meeting the traditional entry requirements for the MSN program, an Alternate Entry option provides an opportunity to explore the program, suggesting flexibility for prospective students with diverse educational backgrounds.

2) Emphasis on Certification: Each concentration area within the MSN program prepares graduates for specific national certification examinations, reflecting the program's commitment to aligning education with professional recognition and credentialing requirements.

3) Tailored Clinical Experiences: Within various concentrations, students have opportunities for supervised clinical practice tailored to individual goals and objectives, illustrating the program's focus on personalized learning paths and hands-on experience in specialized areas of nursing.

#7 in Texas

Texas Woman's University

College of Nursing

  • Pin1
    304 Administration Dr, Denton, TX - 76204
  • Tel1
    (940) 898-2000
  • Programs: Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, CNL, Family Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Registered Nursing, Women's Health Nurse Practitioner
  • Award Levels: Bachelor, Doctor of Nursing, MSN, MSN to DNP, Post Master's NP Certificate, RN to BSN, RN to MSN
Person
Nurse Admin: Rosalie Mainous, PhD, APRN, NNP-BC, FAANP, FAAN
Title: Dean, Professor Of Nursing

University Information

  • Faculty Total Faculty: 452
  • Tuition In-State Undergraduate Tuition: $8,394
  • Book Book and Supplies: $1,050
  • Receiving Aid Percent Received Aid: 95%
  • Scholarship Average Grant or Scholarship: $6,897
  • Admitted Percent Admitted: 94%
  • Enrolled Percent Admitted who Enrolled: 21%
  • Graduation Rate Graduation Rate: 48%

Texas Woman's University (TWU) offers a variety of specialized nursing programs designed to meet the evolving needs of the healthcare industry. TWU programs focus on areas such as family care, acute care, adult health, and psychiatric-mental health. The university provides both online and traditional in-person delivery methods, offering flexibility for working professionals. With a strong emphasis on hands-on training and certification preparation, TWU stands as a top-ranked graduate school of nursing.

Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Program

  • Salary Statistics:
    • $107,030 average salary for family nurse practitioners nationally (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • Projected Growth: 52% for nurse practitioners from 2019 to 2029 (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • Delivery Methods: 100% online and traditional in-person at the Dallas and Houston campuses
  • Focus: Holistic patient care, including family dynamics, community influences, and life stages
  • Accreditation: The master's degree program in nursing at TWU is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education

Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (AGACNP)

  • Offered: On all campuses
  • Specialization: Solving complex health issues in a fast-paced setting with exposure to high acuity patient needs

Adult/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner (AGNP)

  • Responsibilities: Assess, diagnose and manage the health of adults
  • Content: Protocols for treatment decisions, referrals, and follow-ups for commonly encountered health conditions

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP)

  • Format: 100% online classwork with assistance in clinical placement
  • Need: Rapidly growing need for mental health practitioners
  • Training: Specialty in counseling and substance use disorder with weekly clinical supervision in all practicum courses
  • Certification: Eligible to sit for the ANCC Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (Across the Lifespan) certification exam upon completion

With a range of specialized programs designed to meet various healthcare needs, Texas Woman's University stands as one of the top-ranked graduate schools of nursing. The offerings include both online and traditional delivery methods, covering areas like family care, acute care, adult health, and psychiatric-mental health. Emphasizing hands-on training and certification preparation, TWU caters to the current and future demands of the healthcare industry.

#8 in Texas

Baylor University

Louise Herrington School of Nursing

  • Pin1
    Baylor University, Waco, TX - 76798
  • Tel1
    (254) 710-1011
  • Programs: Family Nurse Practitioner, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, Registered Nursing
  • Award Levels: Accelerated BSN, Bachelor, BSN to DNP, MSN, MSN to DNP
Person
Nurse Admin: Linda Plank, PhD, RN, NEA-BC
Title: Dean

University Information

  • Faculty Total Faculty: 1092
  • Tuition In-State Undergraduate Tuition: $1,302
  • Book Book and Supplies: N/A
  • Receiving Aid Percent Received Aid: 95%
  • Scholarship Average Grant or Scholarship: $24,605
  • Admitted Percent Admitted: 68%
  • Enrolled Percent Admitted who Enrolled: 16%
  • Graduation Rate Graduation Rate: 79%

At Baylor University, the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) online program is designed for registered nurses with a BSN or MSN, aiming to elevate them to the highest echelons of nursing practice. Graduates leave as visionary leaders and competent clinicians capable of shaping patient outcomes, policy, and the future trajectory of nursing.

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP online)

Family Nurse Practitioner Track

  • Develop as a holistic healthcare provider focusing on outcomes across the lifespan.
  • Gain leadership and clinical skills to innovate and manage a thriving practice.

Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Track

  • Lead in nursing care for infants up to their second year of life.
  • Specialize in high-risk neonates and family care.

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Track

  • Focus on primary healthcare for children and adolescents, applying family-centered care.
  • Provide care for complex acute, critical, or chronic pediatric conditions.

Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Track

  • Specialize in acute critical care for adult patients.
  • Practice with more clinical autonomy.

Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Track

  • Delve into theoretical and clinical models of mental health and addiction across the lifespan.
  • Implement evidence-based clinical practices for patient-centered care.

Key Student Takeaways

  • Personalized Clinical Placement: 90% of clinical placements are within 125 miles of your home, allowing for a convenient educational experience.
  • Impressive Pass Rates: Enjoy a 100% certification pass rate in Family Nurse Practitioner and Nurse-Midwifery tracks.
  • High Rankings: Baylor University's DNP program ranks higher than 88% of Texas DNP programs and is situated among the top 94% of colleges nationwide according to various reports.
  • Versatile Career Opportunities: With multiple specialized tracks, you have the freedom to pursue a nursing path that is most aligned with your career goals.
  • Leadership and Autonomy: The DNP program prepares you for roles where you can enact change, both in clinical practice and policy.

Whether you're seeking to specialize or aim for a leadership position in nursing, Baylor's DNP programs offer a comprehensive educational package that's hard to beat.

#9 in Texas

The University of Texas at Tyler

School of Nursing

  • Pin1
    3900 University Blvd, Tyler, TX - 75799-6699
  • Tel1
    (903) 566-7000
  • Programs: Family Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Registered Nursing
  • Award Levels: Accelerated BSN, APRN Certificate, Bachelor, BSN to PhD, Doctor of Nursing, LPN to BSN, MSN, MSN to DNP, Post Master's NP Certificate
Person
Nurse Admin: Barbara Haas, PhD, RN
Title: Dean

University Information

  • Faculty Total Faculty: 362
  • Tuition In-State Undergraduate Tuition: $9,596
  • Book Book and Supplies: $1,650
  • Receiving Aid Percent Received Aid: 80%
  • Scholarship Average Grant or Scholarship: $7,903
  • Admitted Percent Admitted: 92%
  • Enrolled Percent Admitted who Enrolled: 35%
  • Graduation Rate Graduation Rate: 43%

The University of Texas at Tyler (UT Tyler) aims to empower nursing students through a strengths-based, learner-centered environment. The School of Nursing prepares its graduates to excel in various roles, from generalists and educators to advanced practitioners and nurse leaders. UT Tyler offers a multitude of programs, both at the undergraduate and graduate level, designed to meet the complex needs of the healthcare sector. Their programs boast high success rates in national board exams and offer flexible learning formats.

College of Nursing

MSN Family Nurse Practitioner

  • Format: Hybrid model with web-enhanced courses
  • Credits: 47 semester credit hours (25 online, 22 clinical)
  • Success Rate: 100% of graduates passed their national board exams on the first attempt
  • Clinical Requirements: 1-2 days per semester on the Tyler campus

MSN Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner

  • Format: Mostly online except for a hybrid course and 1 or 2 hands-on clinicals on campus
  • Credits: 49 semester credit hours
  • Licensing: Must obtain a valid Texas license, as all clinical hours must be completed in Texas
  • Advancement: Serves as a sound basis for future doctoral studies

Post-MSN Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate

  • Format: brid model
  • Credits: 29 semester credit hours (7 online, 22 clinical)
  • Clinical Requirements: 1-2 days per semester on the Tyler campus
  • Success Rate: 100% of graduates passed their national board exams on the first attempt

Post-MSN Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Certificate

  • Format: Online
  • Credits: 24 semester credit hours for APRN majors, 34 for Non-APRN majors
  • Licensing: Must obtain a valid Texas license, as all clinical hours must be completed in Texas
  • Advancement: Serves as a sound basis for future doctoral studies

Key Student Takeaways

  • High Success Rates: The programs boast a 100% pass rate for FNP graduates in their national board exams, ensuring quality education.
  • Flexible Formats: With a blend of online and hybrid courses, the programs offer flexibility to accommodate different learning styles and schedules.
  • Comprehensive Clinical Training: All programs offer rigorous clinical experiences that are integral for skill-building.
  • Networking Opportunities: Small course sizes foster strong faculty-student relationships and allow for more personalized learning.
  • State-Specific Licensing: For those intending to practice in Texas, the clinical hour requirements align well with state licensing needs.

UT Tyler's nursing programs provide a comprehensive, flexible, and high-quality educational experience, preparing students for a range of roles in healthcare.

#10 in Texas

The University of Texas at Arlington

College of Nursing and Health Innovation

  • Pin1
    701 S. Nedderman Dr., Arlington, TX - 76013
  • Tel1
    (817) 272-2011
  • Programs: Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Family Nurse Practitioner, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Registered Nursing
  • Award Levels: Accelerated BSN, APRN Certificate, Bachelor, BSN to PhD, Doctor of Nursing, MSN, MSN to DNP, Post Master's NP Certificate
Person
Nurse Admin: Elizabeth Merwin, PhD, RN, FAAN
Title: Dean

University Information

  • Faculty Total Faculty: 1241
  • Tuition In-State Undergraduate Tuition: $11,727
  • Book Book and Supplies: $1,150
  • Receiving Aid Percent Received Aid: 90%
  • Scholarship Average Grant or Scholarship: $7,127
  • Admitted Percent Admitted: 88%
  • Enrolled Percent Admitted who Enrolled: 30%
  • Graduation Rate Graduation Rate: 52%

The University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) offers an expansive range of Nurse Practitioner programs designed to equip nurses for specialized roles in a variety of healthcare settings. Students will gain a solid foundation in clinical skills, healthcare management, and interdisciplinary leadership. Whether it's caring for the elderly, children, or those with mental health issues, the UTA programs prepare you to provide top-quality care as a certified Nurse Practitioner.

Graduate NP Programs

Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Program (AG ACNP)

  • Online and In-person: Both options available.
  • Focus: Managing the health of individuals from late adolescence to end-of-life, particularly those with complex, acute, and chronic illnesses.
  • Outcome: Prepared for National Certification through ANCC or AACN; licensure through the Texas Board of Nursing.

Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program (AG PCNP)

  • Online and In-person: Both options available.
  • Focus: Specializes in primary care with an emphasis on health promotion, illness prevention, and chronic health management needs of older adults.
  • Outcome: Eligibility for National Certification through ANCC or AANP and state licensure.

Dual Adult Gerontology Acute and Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program (AG A/PCNP)

  • Online and In-person: Both options available.
  • Focus: A hybrid of both acute and primary care for individuals from adolescence to end-of-life.
  • Outcome: Eligibility for dual National Certification and state licensure.

Family Nurse Practitioner Program (FNP)

  • Online: Yes.
  • Focus: Managing healthcare for individuals and families across the lifespan, concentrating on health promotion and acute care.
  • Outcome: Eligibility for National Certification through ANCC or AANP and state licensure.

Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Program (NNP)

  • Online and In-person: Both options available.
  • Focus: Prepares NICU nurses to manage the care of premature and ill newborns.
  • Outcome: Eligibility for the NNP certification exam and state licensure.

Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Program

  • Online: Yes.
  • Focus: Management of acute, complex, and chronic illnesses in pediatric patients.
  • Outcome: Eligibility for National Certification through the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board and state licensure.

Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program

  • Online and In-person: Both options available.
  • Focus: Management of well, acute, and chronically ill pediatric patients.
  • Outcome: Eligibility for National Certification and state licensure.

Dual Pediatric Acute and Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program

  • Online: Yes.
  • Focus: A combination of both acute and primary care for pediatric patients.
  • Outcome: Eligibility for dual National Certification and state licensure.

Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP)

  • Online: Yes.
  • Focus: Trains nurses for mental health care across the lifespan in a variety of settings.
  • Outcome: Eligibility for ANCC board certification and state licensure.

Key Student Takeaways:

  • Career Versatility: Programs cover a range of specializations from acute to primary care, pediatric to adult gerontology, and even psychiatric mental health.
  • Flexibility: Most programs are offered both online and in-person, catering to the needs of working professionals.
  • Interdisciplinary Leadership: UTA’s strong focus on leadership skills prepares students for management and decision-making roles in diverse healthcare settings.
  • Cutting-Edge Curriculum: Incorporates the latest research findings to ensure you are updated with contemporary practices.
  • Streamlined Programs: Dual specialization programs allow you to complete degree requirements and clinical hours for both acute and primary care in one program.
  • Highly Employable: Graduates are well-prepared for the complexities of modern healthcare and are highly sought after in the job market.

#11 in Texas

Midwestern State University

Wilson School of Nursing

  • Pin1
    3410 Taft Blvd, Wichita Falls, TX - 76308-2099
  • Tel1
    (940) 397-4000
  • Programs: Family Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Registered Nursing
  • Award Levels: APRN Certificate, Bachelor, MSN, Post Master's NP Certificate, RN to BSN, RN to MSN
Person
Nurse Admin: Robin Lockhart, PhD, MSN, RN, CNE
Title: Chair

University Information

  • Faculty Total Faculty: 233
  • Tuition In-State Undergraduate Tuition: $9,954
  • Book Book and Supplies: $800
  • Receiving Aid Percent Received Aid: 97%
  • Scholarship Average Grant or Scholarship: $8,495
  • Admitted Percent Admitted: 71%
  • Enrolled Percent Admitted who Enrolled: 28%
  • Graduation Rate Graduation Rate: 44%

At Midwestern State University's Wilson School of Nursing, you won't just study nursing; you'll live it. Prepare yourself to transform healthcare as either a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) or a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP). You'll delve into specialized coursework, gain hands-on clinical experience, and emerge ready to ace national certification exams.

Master's of Science in Nursing NP Programs

Master the Art of Family Care through the FNP Program

  • Who Should Join: Registered Nurses passionate about family healthcare should apply. Master’s-prepared nurses can also earn a post-graduate certificate.

  • Skills You'll Hone: Build your skills in comprehensive family care, from neonates to the elderly.

  • Structure: Dive into 48 credit hours: 18 for core courses, 24 for clinical experience, and 6 for a research project.

  • Certification: Get ready to conquer national certification exams. You'll also meet the Texas State Nursing Board's standards for advanced practice.

Specialize in Mental Health with the PMHNP Program

  • Who Should Join: If mental health captivates you and you're an RN, this program awaits you. Those with a master's degree can opt for a post-graduate certificate.

  • Skills You'll Hone: Learn to diagnose, treat, and manage mental health conditions across all age groups.

  • Structure: Immerse yourself in 48 credit hours: 21 for nursing core, 18 for clinical specialty, and 9 for a research project.

  • Certification: Prepare to ace national certification exams and fulfill all Texas Nursing Board requirements.

Why Midwestern State is Your Best Bet

  • Learn from Experts: Our faculty aren't just educators; they're practicing nurses with doctoral preparation.

  • Customize Your Journey: Choose either a master's degree or a post-graduate certificate to fit your career goals.

  • Get Your Hands Dirty: Don’t just learn the theory; practice it during extensive clinical hours.

  • Research Matters: Master the skill of integrating cutting-edge research into daily practice.

  • Go National: Use your Texas-approved training to earn nationally recognized certifications.

  • Modern Facilities: Experience healthcare scenarios in our top-notch simulation labs.

  • Launch Your Career: These programs aren't just another degree; they’re your fast track to specialized career opportunities.

You're not just enrolling for a course at Midwestern State University; you're embarking on a transformative journey to redefine healthcare.

See our Ranking Methodology

How Become a Nurse Practitioner in Texas – Eight Steps

  1. Earn an RN Degree – All Nurse Practitioners (NPs) must first become RNs. Getting your RN through an ADN or BSN program is your first step. Be sure to earn your RN or BSN from a university that is accredited by the ACEN or CCNE because your class credits are more likely to be accepted by your Nurse Practitioner programs in Texas if you earned your RN from an accredited school. Find the Best Ranked Texas Nursing Schools.
  2. Pass The NCLEX-RN Exam – Our practice tests  and NCLEX-RN exam study guide are just the tools you need to help you prepare for test day.
  3. Earn Your MSN or DNP – To become an NP you can either get your masters or doctorate. Master’s of Science in Nursing (MSN) programs take about 2 years while Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs take about 4 years. You will choose a population foci such as gerontology, family, neonatal when you start your program:
  4. Complete Supervised Clinical Hours – If you earn your MSN you will need to between 500-600 clinical hours depending on your population focus. To earn your DNP you need 1000 hours.
  5. Become Board Certified – Your certifying body to become an NP depends on your population foci:
  6. Obtain Licensure – Licensure is done on a state-by-state basis. Contact the Texas state board of nursing Texas Board of Nursing for more information.
  7. Obtain a DEA Number – DEA registration is required in order to prescribe medication in Texas. Once you are licensed, apply for your NPI number which is free. Then you use this to apply for your State Controlled Substances Authority for Texas and then your DEA registration so that you can prescribe medications.
  8. Maintain Active Certification and Licensure – Your certifying body and BON in Texas will tell you what is required to maintain certification and licensure. Usually this requires a certain amount of continuing education (CE) credits as well as clinical practice. You may also have to fill out an application and pay a fee every 2-3 years.

How Long Does it Take to Become a Nurse Practitioner in Texas

How much time it takes to become an NP in Texas really depends on your background. Depending on the path you take it will be 2 to 4 years of education before you can become a Certified Nurse Practitioner. If you’re already an RN it can take as little as 2 years by earning your MSN. If you are not an RN some direct entry programs are as short as 2 years as well. If you already have your MSN but are not an NP you can do a DNP program in 2-3 years and become and NP while also earning your doctorate.

Here are examples of how long it will take you to become an NP depending on what degree you are starting with:

Starting Degree

How Many Years to Become an NP

Associate’s Degree in Nursing (ADN)

2 years
Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing (BSN) 2 years

Bachelor’s in a non-nursing field 2 – 3 years

Master’s Degree in Nursing (MSN)

1 – 2 years

Nurse Practitioner Requirements and Types in Texas

BSN to MSN

If you are getting your MSN after having your BSN in the state of Texas, you can expect to spend 2 years earning your degree to become NP. If you have your RN, but not your BSN, you can complete a program that is similar in length and will give you an MSN. General requirements to enter and complete your BSN to MSN program in Texas include:

  • A 3.0 GPA or the equivalent of a B average
  • Must be licensed as an RN in Texas
  • Complete about 50 credits of classroom work
  • Complete 500 to 800 hours of supervised clinical experience depending upon the University

Direct Entry MSN Programs

Direct Entry MSN programs or accelerated MSN programs give people who are not nurses but have a bachelors degree in something else the opportunity pursue nursing. These programs prepare you to be an NP without having you repeat non-nursing college courses that you have already taken. There are a handful of these programs in Texas. Direct entry programs take between 2 and 3 years to complete. After the program you will be an RN and an NP. General requirements to enter and to complete your accelerated MSN program in Texas include:

  • A 3.0 GPA or the equivalent of a B average
  • Completion of pre-requisites such as anatomy and physiology, developmental psychology, microbiology, organic and inorganic chemistry, and more
  • Complete about ## credits of classroom work
  • Complete 500 to 1,000 hours of supervised clinical experience depending upon the University

MSN to NP Certificate

If you already have your MSN but are not an NP you can complete a certificate program to train you to be an NP. This may be the right path for you if you have your MSN in something like nursing education, nursing administration, or if you are a clinical nurse specialist. In general MSN to NP certificate programs take about one year and to enter and to complete your NP to Certificate program requires the following:

  • You must be an RN in Texas to be eligible to apply for these programs
  • Typically you are not required to take the GRE again for these programs
  • You will have to submit an application with your resume, references, past transcripts and more
  • Complete 500 to 700 clinical hours depending on the school and your population focus

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

DNP programs are the doctorate level programs that prepare nurses to be NPs. In these programs you will be trained to provide nursing care at the expert level and will also be able to teach in most universities. DNP programs are becoming more popular as the entry pathway into becoming an NP.  Program length varies from 3 to 5 years depending on whether or not you already have your masters. The eligibility requirements vary a little between the BSN to DNP and MSN to DNP programs.

BSN to DNP: These programs are for bachelor’s level trained nurses.

  • You must be a licensed Texas nurse and have had a GPA of at least 3.0 (B average) or better.
  • The BSN to DNP programs will take about 5 years depending on the university.
  • Your application will need to include GRE scores, letters of recommendation, previous transcripts, and more.
  • You will need to complete 1000 hours of supervised clinical experiences.
  • Some programs will require you to have nursing experience.

MSN to DNP: These programs take into account that you are already a nurse trained at the master’s level. Depending on the program you may be required to already be an NP in Texas.

  • All programs will require you to have your Texas RN license.
  • These programs will take between 2 and 3 years to complete.
  • Like the BSN to DNP programs you need to submit an application with letters of recommendations, past transcripts, and more.
  • You do not have to take the GRE however, as it is assumed that you already had to take it for your MSN.
  • At the end of your DNP education you will not only be an NP but you will also have completed the highest level of clinical nursing education available.

Online Nurse Practitioner Programs

Online NP programs do exist, and with many already busy professionals pursuing higher education these online options can be a lifesaver. These offer an online platform to attend classes, complete coursework, do quizzes and even partake in class discussions. Of course any clinical experiences will have to be done in person, but your school can help you arrange these in a convenient location.

Nurse Practitioner Programs In Texas

Nurse Practitioner Programs in Texas

Where Do Nurse Practitioner Typically Work in Texas?

As an NP the world is at your fingertips. You can work in a variety of settings and will have the flexibility throughout your career to change it up. Here are some examples of where you may work.

  • Adult Gerontology Acute Care NP: Cardiology,  neurology, emergency departments, intensive care units, medical surgical units, military settings, and more.
  • Adult Gerontology Primary Care NP: primary care clinics, nursing homes, correctional facilities, college health, occupational health, military settings, and more.
  • Family NP: Primary care clinics, community health, urgent care, college health, occupational health,  military settings, dermatology, shelters, and more.
  • Neonatal NP: neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), emergency departments, labor and delivery units, and more.
  • Pediatric Acute Care NP: Emergency departments, specialty units in children’s hospitals, urgent care.
  • Pediatric Primary Care NP: community health centers, schools, children’s hospitals, private practices.
  • Psychiatric Mental Health NP: outpatient therapy, inpatient psychiatric units, partial hospitalization units, nursing homes, and more.
  • Women’s Health NP: Community health centers, women’s prisons, private practices, urogynecology practices, adolescent health, and more.

Potential Employers for Nurse Practitioners in Texas

When it comes to employment opportunities for nurse practitioners in Texas, a range of healthcare organizations provide rewarding career prospects. Here are different types of employers, along with examples of specific organizations where nurse practitioners can thrive:

Hospitals and Medical Centers

Hospitals and medical centers serve as dynamic healthcare hubs, offering diverse specialties and comprehensive care. Nurse practitioners in these settings play a crucial role in patient management, diagnosis, and treatment. Examples of hospitals and medical centers in Texas include:

Outpatient Clinics and Urgent Care Centers

Outpatient clinics and urgent care centers provide accessible and timely healthcare services for non-emergency medical needs. Nurse practitioners in these settings offer primary care, minor procedures, and acute care services. Examples of outpatient clinics and urgent care centers in Texas include:

Private Practices and Specialty Clinics

Private practices and specialty clinics provide specialized care in specific medical fields. Nurse practitioners in these settings often collaborate closely with physicians, delivering patient-centered care. Examples of private practices and specialty clinics in Texas include:

Community Health Centers and Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs)

Community health centers and FQHCs focus on providing healthcare services to underserved populations, including low-income individuals and those without insurance. Nurse practitioners in these settings deliver primary care, preventive services, and health education. Examples of community health centers and FQHCs in Texas include:

Long-Term Care Facilities and Nursing Homes

Long-term care facilities and nursing homes provide specialized care to individuals who require extended assistance and support. Nurse practitioners in these settings work closely with interdisciplinary teams, ensuring comprehensive care and promoting the well-being of residents. Examples of long-term care facilities and nursing homes in Texas include:

Academic Institutions and Universities

Academic institutions and universities serve as centers for education, research, and the advancement of healthcare knowledge. Nurse practitioners in these settings have opportunities to contribute to teaching, research, and clinical practice. Examples of academic institutions and universities in Texas include:

Government and Military Facilities

Government and military facilities provide healthcare services to specific populations, such as veterans, active-duty military personnel, and their families. Nurse practitioners in these facilities deliver care while adhering to unique regulations and serving those who have served the country. Examples of government and military facilities in Texas include:

Home Health Care Agencies

Home health care agencies provide essential healthcare services to patients in the comfort of their own homes. Nurse practitioners in these agencies focus on delivering personalized care, managing chronic conditions, and coordinating interdisciplinary care teams. Examples of home health care agencies in Texas include:

Here is an expanded list of health organizations in Texas where Nurse Practitioners may find valuable opportunities. Nurse Practitioners are integral members of the healthcare team, providing a broad range of health services including diagnosis, treatment, education, and counseling. In Texas, with its vast size and diverse population, the demand for skilled Nurse Practitioners is high across a range of healthcare settings:

  • Baylor Scott & White Health: Baylor Scott & White Health is the largest not-for-profit healthcare system in Texas, providing full-range, inpatient, outpatient, rehabilitation, and emergency medical services through 52 hospitals and other facilities.
  • Texas Health Resources: Texas Health Resources is one of the largest faith-based, nonprofit health systems in the United States, and it operates a network of hospitals across North Texas.
  • Memorial Hermann Health System: Memorial Hermann, based in Houston, is the largest not-for-profit health system in Southeast Texas, with a broad network of care facilities.
  • Methodist Healthcare System: The Methodist Healthcare System, based in San Antonio, is the largest provider of health care in South Texas, offering comprehensive health solutions across ten hospital locations.
  • University of Texas Medical Branch: UTMB operates a comprehensive health system encompassing a wide variety of leading-edge patient care, research, and education facilities, including hospitals, clinics, and outreach sites throughout Texas.
  • HCA Houston Healthcare: HCA Houston Healthcare is a comprehensive network of hospitals, diagnostic centers, cancer centers, and emergency rooms across the greater Houston area.
  • St. David’s HealthCare: St. David’s HealthCare is a unique, locally managed system of hospitals, outpatient centers, and specialists, providing care for Central Texas.
  • MD Anderson Cancer Center: Based in Houston, MD Anderson is one of the world’s most respected cancer centers, dedicated to patient care, research, education, and prevention.
  • CHRISTUS Health: CHRISTUS Health is a Catholic, not-for-profit system made up of more than 600 centers, including long-term care facilities, community hospitals, walk-in clinics and health ministries.
  • JPS Health Network: JPS Health Network provides care to families in Tarrant County, regardless of their ability to pay, and operates a network of health centers and school-based clinics.

Campus and Online Nurse Practitioner Programs in Texas

University Offered asCity/State
Angelo State University Campus, HybridSan Angelo, TX
Baylor University Campus, HybridWaco, TX
Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi Campus, OnlineCorpus Christi, TX
University of Houston-Victoria Campus, Hybrid, OnlineVictoria, TX
University of the Incarnate Word Campus, Hybrid, OnlineSan Antonio, TX
Texas A & M International University Campus, OnlineLaredo, TX
University of Mary Hardin-Baylor Campus, HybridBelton, TX
Midwestern State University Campus, Hybrid, OnlineWichita Falls, TX
Prairie View A & M University Campus, OnlinePrairie View, TX
Stephen F Austin State University Campus, OnlineNacogdoches, TX
The University of Texas at Arlington Campus, Hybrid, OnlineArlington, TX
The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Campus, HybridSan Antonio, TX
The University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing Campus, OnlineGalveston, TX
The University of Texas at Austin Campus, HybridAustin, TX
The University of Texas at El Paso Campus, OnlineEl Paso, TX
The University of Texas at Tyler Campus, Hybrid, OnlineTyler, TX
Texas Woman’s University Campus, Hybrid, OnlineDenton, TX
West Texas A & M University Campus, Hybrid, OnlineCanyon, TX
The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Campus, Hybrid, OnlineHouston, TX
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Campus, Hybrid, OnlineLubbock, TX
Texas State University San Marcos and St. David School of Nursing Campus, HybridSan Marcos, TX

Cost of Nurse Practitioner Programs in Texas

The costs for nurse practitioner programs in Texas can vary significantly depending on the type of program, the school, and the specifics of the program. Here are some average costs based on the data up to 2021:

  • RN to MSN nurse practitioner program: $20,000 – $35,000
  • BSN to MSN nurse practitioner program: $20,000 – $40,000
  • Direct entry MSN nurse practitioner program: $50,000 – $90,000
  • BSN to DNP nurse practitioner program: $30,000 – $60,000
  • MSN to DNP nurse practitioner program: $20,000 – $35,000
  • Post-master’s certification nurse practitioner program: $5,000 – $15,000
  1. University of Texas at Austin – Master’s in Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner Program: This program prepares students for advanced practice nursing in a variety of clinical settings ranging from private practices, clinics, hospital systems, and businesses to managed care organizations and governmental agencies. The estimated total cost for this program is approximately $25,000 – $35,000 for in-state students and may vary for out-of-state students due to differences in tuition.
  2. Texas Woman’s University – Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP): This program is designed to prepare nurse leaders to improve the quality of patient care and enhance patient outcomes. It focuses on providing leadership for evidence-based practice, and will incorporate the advanced knowledge and skills needed in the complex health care environment. The estimated total cost for this program is approximately $30,000 – $40,000.

These cost estimates include tuition and fees, but they may not include other costs like books, supplies, or living expenses. Prices also vary depending on whether you are an in-state or out-of-state student, full-time or part-time, among other factors.

To help offset the cost of becoming an NP you can apply for scholarships and/or loan forgiveness programs. Here are a few examples.

Scholarships outside of the school you are applying to are not as common for NP programs as they are for BSN programs, but our Nursing School  and Scholarship guide  can help you figure out additional ways to offset costs.

10 Texas Nurse Practitioner Scholarships

  1. TNP Foundation Scholarship – This scholarship, offered by Texas Nurse Practitioners, awards educational funds to qualified members pursuing advanced degrees in nursing. The deadline typically falls in July, and the scholarship amounts vary each year.
  2. Nurse’s Touch Scholarship – Offered by Texas Association of Vocational Nurse Educators, this scholarship is awarded to outstanding Texas nurse practitioners seeking to further their education. Applications are typically due in April, with scholarship amounts also varying yearly.
  3. Betty Trotter Scholarship Fund – Administered by the Houston Area Nurse Practitioners, this scholarship is awarded to Nurse Practitioners or NP students who demonstrate exceptional commitment to community service. The deadline is typically in October and the scholarship amount is $1,000.
  4. Promise of Nursing Scholarships – Funded by Texas Nurses Foundation, this scholarship is awarded to undergraduate and graduate nursing students. Deadlines and amounts vary, but scholarships are generally in the $1,000-$3,000 range.
  5. C. Fay Raines Innovation Scholarship – Offered by the North Texas Nurse Practitioners, this scholarship supports innovative NP students or practicing NPs. The deadline and the scholarship amount are usually announced on the NTNP website.
  6. Texas Nurses Association District 9 ScholarshipTexas Nurses Association District 9 offers scholarships for members pursuing further education in nursing, including nurse practitioners. Deadlines and scholarship amounts can vary each year.
  7. Graduate Nursing Loan-Forgiveness Program – This program offered by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board provides loan repayment assistance to Texas residents who are pursuing graduate nursing education. Application deadlines and award amounts are updated annually on their website.
  8. Pearl Merritt Endowed Scholarship – Provided by the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, this scholarship supports graduate students in the School of Nursing. Application deadlines and scholarship amounts vary.
  9. Greater Texas Foundation Scholarship – This scholarship, provided by University of Texas at Arlington, is available to nursing students, including NP students, with a preference given to students from rural areas. Deadlines and amounts are updated annually on their website.
  10. Parkland Health & Hospital System Endowed Scholarship for Nurse Practitioners – Sponsored by the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, this scholarship assists students pursuing an advanced practice degree in nursing. Information regarding deadlines and scholarship amounts can be found on their website.

Nurse Practitioner Salaries in Texas

In Texas, the field of nurse practitioners (NPs) is both dynamic and lucrative. As of recent data, there are currently 17,810 NPs employed throughout the state, making Texas home to 8% of all Nurse Practitioners in the U.S. These healthcare professionals earn an average annual salary of $117,890, equating to an hourly wage of $56.68. This robust earning potential, combined with the significant role NPs play in the state’s healthcare system, makes this profession highly desirable.

Looking forward, the demand for NPs in Texas is projected to increase considerably. By 2030, the state will require approximately 24,600 new NPs, translating to an addition of about 2,010 new nursing positions each year. This predicted growth underscores the ongoing importance of NPs in providing critical healthcare services, and it promises a strong job market for those entering the profession in the coming years.

  • The number of Nurse Practitioners currently employed in Texas is 17,810.
  • Nurse Practitioners in Texas earn an average of $117,890 per year or $56.68 per hour.
  • The percentage of U.S. Nurse Practitioners who work in Texas is 8%.
  • Texas will need 24,600 new Nurse Practitioners by 2030 or 2,010 new nurses per year.

Here are the average salaries for Nurse Practitioners based on their population foci in Texas.

Population FociEstimated Salary
Adult Gerontology Acute Care$110,000 – $130,000
Adult Gerontology Primary Care$105,000 – $125,000
Family Nurse Practitioner$110,000 – $130,000
Neonatal$115,000 – $135,000
Psychiatric Mental Health$120,000 – $140,000
Pediatric Acute Care$110,000 – $130,000
Pediatric Primary Care$105,000 – $125,000
Women’s Health$105,000 – $125,000
US Bureau of Labor StatisticsDepartment of LaborUS Department of Education

Approximately 10% of Nurse Practitioners earn under $81,160, a rate generally reserved for less experienced or entry level Nurse Practitioners.

PercentExperienceEmployedAnnual Salary
10%Less than a Year1,781Under $81,160
15%2 – 4 years2,672$81,160 – $99,880
25%5 – 9 years4,452$99,880 – $121,010
25%10 – 14 years4,452$121,010 – $128,810
15%15 – 20 years2,672$121,010 – $154,080
10%20+ years1,781Above $154,080
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and U.S. Department of Commerce – 2022

Texas Employment and Salary Report

This 2023 report is an essential tool for professionals, job seekers, employers, and policymakers, providing insights into the labor market’s trends and dynamics.

Texas Organizations and Associations for Nurse Practitioners

  1. Texas Nurse Practitioners – Texas Nurse Practitioners (TNP) serves as a voice of Nurse Practitioners in Texas. It provides resources for its members, influences legislation and promotes the profession across the state.
  2. North Texas Nurse Practitioners – The North Texas Nurse Practitioners (NTNP) is a regional organization dedicated to professional development and advocacy for NPs in the Northern Texas area. It provides educational resources, networking opportunities, and legislative updates.
  3. Houston Area Nurse Practitioners – The Houston Area Nurse Practitioners (HANP) is a local organization that aims to promote professional collaboration among nurse practitioners in the Houston area. They also provide educational programs and advocate for issues relevant to NPs in the region.
  4. San Antonio Nurses in Advanced Practice – This is a regional organization that supports nurse practitioners in San Antonio. They provide education, networking opportunities, and advocacy to enhance the practice of nurse practitioners in this region.
  5. Central Texas Nurse Practitioners – Serving the Central Texas area, this organization provides resources for its members, promotes high standards of care, and advocates for issues relevant to nurse practitioners in Central Texas.
  6. South Plains Nurse Practitioner Association – This organization supports nurse practitioners in the South Plains region of Texas. They provide professional development, networking, and advocacy efforts to improve the practice of NPs in this area.

National Organizations and Associations for Nurse Practitioners

Since it is such a popular career path there are multiple resources and organizations available for you to utilize as you gather more information when looking for support as a Texas Nurse Practitioner:

  1. American Psychiatric Nurses Association – The American Psychiatric Nurses Association, a vital resource for psychiatric nurses, fosters knowledge-sharing among its members, many of whom are Texas Nurse Practitioners. Its commitment to mental health extends to improving the mental health care services in Texas.
  2. American Association of Nurse Practitioners – Catering to the needs of all Nurse Practitioners, the American Association of Nurse Practitioners provides a collective voice for NPs in Texas and across the nation. It supports their professional development and the advancement of their role in healthcare delivery.
  3. Society of Nurses in Advanced Practice – This organization offers a robust platform for advanced practice nurses, including those in Texas, to collaborate, network, and advocate for the profession. The Society of Nurses in Advanced Practice is dedicated to the elevation of standards and competencies in advanced nursing.
  4. Nurse Practitioner Associates for Continuing Education – As a recognized leader in continuing education for nurse practitioners, the Nurse Practitioner Associates for Continuing Education furnishes Texas Nurse Practitioners with essential resources to maintain the highest level of professional competency.
  5. Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation – This foundation is deeply committed to improving health outcomes in Texas and beyond. The Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation drives this mission by promoting research and advocating for policies that benefit nurse practitioners and their patients.
  6. National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners – The National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners champions pediatric health, a cause that resonates with many Texas Nurse Practitioners. It promotes advanced practice nursing by providing educational resources and advocacy efforts.
  7. International Council of Nursing Nurse Practitioner/Advanced Practice Nursing Network – Bridging the gap between Texas and the global nursing community, this organization connects nurse practitioners in a vibrant network, fostering a culture of collaborative learning and resource sharing.
  8. Doctors of Nursing Practice – Doctors of Nursing Practice is an important asset for doctoral-prepared nurses in Texas, dedicated to promoting the highest standard of care and championing advancements in healthcare delivery.
  9. Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association – With a focus on geriatric health, this association provides Texas Nurse Practitioners serving elderly populations with the resources they need to ensure optimal patient care.
  10. National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties – This organization empowers the educators who shape the future of nursing in Texas. It champions excellence in nursing education, ensuring Texas Nurse Practitioners are equipped with up-to-date knowledge and skills.
  11. Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health – Advocating for women’s health care, this organization supports Texas Nurse Practitioners in their endeavors to provide exceptional care to women across all stages of life.
  12. Advanced Practitioner Society for Hematology and Oncology – As a beacon of support for those treating patients with hematologic and oncologic conditions, this society offers a collaborative platform for Nurse Practitioners in Texas and beyond, focusing on cancer care.
  13. National Academy of Dermatology Nurse Practitioners – The National Academy of Dermatology Nurse Practitioners guides Texas Nurse Practitioners in delivering outstanding dermatological care. It serves as a conduit for sharing knowledge, best practices, and research in dermatology nursing.
  14. American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners – This academy is instrumental in supporting emergency Nurse Practitioners in Texas. It cultivates professional development, advocates for emergency NP practice, and enhances the delivery of urgent and emergent care.

Best Ranked Nurse Practitioner Programs in Your State

Embark on an enriching pathway in healthcare with our handpicked list of top Nurse Practitioner (NP) programs in each state. Whether initiating your voyage or elevating your proficiency, the right program is paramount. Our guide illuminates esteemed programs in close proximity, establishing a robust foundation for your progressive nursing career ambitions.